“Like” love for Corona Light

In just two months, Corona Light Beer’s Facebook page increased from 3,000 to 200,000 likes.

See how they did it below.

Two years later, Corona Light Beer has 441,000 likes.

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Google Treasure Maps

Users are not impressed with Apple’s iOS6 Maps software that has replaced Google Maps on the iPhone 5. The Amazing iOS 6 Maps blog pays umbrage to Apple and the many ‘fails’ its new software possesses.

The Statue of Liberty Disappearing Act

As Apple struggles out of Google’s strong hold, other international brands are seeking to collaborate with the Internet superpower. Philips have hidden 10 of their new Smart-TV’s around the globe on Google Maps (see below). Users are given photos of the almost frameless televisions in their hidden locations; some appear to be in very remote areas, and others in more obvious cities. The tricky part is finding the exact locations on Google Maps. Users log in via Facebook to ‘pin’ the televisions when they find them. Photos can also be shared with friends, asking for help.

BMW in Sweden have also launched a Google Maps hunt to promote the new 3 Series. The competition runs for two weeks. Only one car has been placed on Google Maps in Sweden and each day a clue is released via social media making it easier and easier to locate the vehicle as the competition unfolds. The first person to find the car, wins it. Unfortunately, the competition is only available to Sweden residents. Hopefully we will see a similar social media integration campaign by BMW in Australia.

Regulating Social Media

Following a complaint to the Australia Advertising Standards Board, a judgment was made that comments by “fans” on Smirnoff Vodka’s Facebook page were considered “advertisements” and must therefore comply with industry regulatory codes and consumer protection laws.

The watchdog heard that a fan of the Facebook page commented that Smirnoff was “the purest Russian vodka” and would lead to success with the opposite sex. John Swinson, a partner at law firm King & Wood Mallesons explained to The Age that Smirnoff is Australian, not Russian and it may not be the purest. The comment also implies that you would have greater success with girls also contravenes Australian advertising codes. Industry codes not only apply to what a company posts on its Facebook page, but also to user-generated comments that followed. As the comments weren’t removed, Smirnoff was held liable for the actions of its “fan”.

Brands are increasingly relying on Facebook “word-of-month” to reach, not only fans, but also their social circles. There is currently very little legislation that governs the use of social media by brands and the decision handed down to Smirnoff just a few weeks ago has already caused havoc in the corporate world. Particularly for larger companies, constantly monitoring social media pages is impossible.

Activity can’t be completely controlled, but it can be managed. When a member of the public posts a complaint or an inaccurate statement on Facebook, companies need to respond immediately clarifying the issue. The problem facing corporations and their adverting agencies is that the Internet doesn’t close down at 5pm everyday nor does online activity cease over the weekend. If anything, user activity on social media increases after business hours. This poses a great challenge particularly to large corporations like Smirnoff who have a following of over 180 000 people.

Recent consumer trends would suggest that the risks of social media are only minor compared to its benefits. Consumers are increasingly using the Internet, and in particular Facebook, to research brands and products before making purchases. 85 per cent of Australians who are connected to the Internet use it as a resource to research, compare and seek advice about their shopping. 61 per cent use search engines, 50 per cent check the brand’s website, and 23 per cent use Facebook (source). I would challenge the last figure. Realistically, it is probably higher considering that a Google search will return the brand’s Facebook page and brand websites have links to their social media pages. Most consumers may not be going directly to Facebook, but they are certainly being directed there.

It is impossible to completely control the activity of users and fans, but strategies should be implemented to manage activity on public pages. Companies don’t have a choice: they need to be using social media as a marketing tool to positively promote their brands and now they must also comply with rapidly evolving standards and legislation.

The Kiwi Sceptics

The Kiwi Sceptics is an online-only reality series that launched in Februrary 2012. Each episode of the Air New Zealand campaign follows an Australian ‘Kiwi Sceptic’ on their surprise journey across the ‘ditch’ to NZ. Each episode focuses on a particular type of sceptic like ‘The Hipster’ who thinks New Zealand is overrun by sheep and ‘The Bali Girl’ who prefers beach resorts and day spas. Sceptics are paired with a New Zealand entertainment personality who joins them on a specifically tailored trip based on the sceptics’ interests.

The campaign is the airline’s largest in the Australian market in the last 10 years. The focus on Australian sceptics came after research discovered that while there are 5.3 million Aussies who would consider New Zealand as a holiday destination, only one in five of these people actually made it across the ‘ditch’. The creative online content was aimed at the young and young-at-heart with the aim of breaking down traditional stereotypes that Aussie’s have of New Zealand. The mini-series depicts something for everyone, whether it is the picturesque scenery, thrill-seeking adventures or the inviting local culture.

http://www.airnewzealand.com.au/kiwi-sceptics

The campaign was supported by the Nine Entertainment Company, which hosted a Kiwi Sceptics page within the ninemsn website. The rollout specifically bombarded Australian news and entertainment websites such as TheAge.com with advertising banners and video commercials and the series has received over 12 million views on Youtube.

After the online hype of the campaign had begun to subside, Air New Zealand released a final episode following Lara Bingle on a winter escape (see below). The latest episode reinvigorated the series’ social media presence as the promotion with Bingle heavily tapped into her extensive fan followings on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

Air New Zealand took a leap in their choice of online content over traditional television advertisements and it certainly paid off. The airline won advertising awards for its ‘Branded Content and Entertainment’ at the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity.

 

Sources: 

http://www.campaignbrief.com/2012/02/post-158.html

http://www.bandt.com.au/news/advertising/australia-has-record-cannes-lions-year